A well loved quilt
a well loved quilt

I create quilts to be used

And mostly the people who receive them use them.

When I make a quilt for someone I hope they will get lots of use out of it. I don’t make them to be put up on a shelf in the closet, or in a cedar chest, I want them to be loved and snuggled under. 

I always try to use good quality quilt shop fabric because I know it will hold up better under heavy use than cheap loose woven fabric will. I also use good quality cotton or wool batting that will hold its shape and keep them warm. Completed with quality backing fabric (often I will use many fabrics to make a scrappy look on the back, as in this post)

But even the best fabrics will wear out.

This quilt is a great example of a well-loved quilt.

I took part in an online scrappy bullseye quilt block swap many years ago, and this is the quilt created from the swapped blocks. I added vertical sashing in complimentary colors and horizontal sashing with white and cream fabrics, then I did heavy quilting between the blocks and spirals in the bullseye. 

My Daughter in Law fell in love with it and it went to their home to live. I made it in 2007 – fast forward to 2020, and I took recent pictures of it. They have 3 children and many animals (dogs and cats) have lived with them over the years. I bought my first Gammill longarm in 2007 and used this quilt to practice free-motion custom quilting; it was one of the first quilts I finished with my own longarm quilting machine. 

These images just go to show that no matter what quality fabrics and supplies you use, if a quilt is loved it will show it.

scrappy bulls eye

Slide show of quilt before and after

Worn but still loved.

This quilt is on their sofa. Any day you stop by you are likely to see one kid snuggled up under it watching TV or reading. It is loved by everyone in the household and it shows.  There are areas that the quilt top is gone, and the batting is showing through, much of the white background fabric looks like lace because it has worn away except where it was stitched down, this creates a beautiful effect but I am thinking it is about time to retire this one and make another.

When a quilt is used daily by a family, washed often and dried it will wear out. I don’t get upset about that, it just gives me an opportunity to make them another one, I just hope they will love the next one I give them as much as they do this one, I know they cherish all the quilts I give them.

 

Continue reading below to learn how to make your own scrappy bullseye quilt.

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Make your own scrappy bullseye quilt

Instructions from simple simon and co.

I found a great tutorial for a scrappy bullseye quilt on simplesimonandco.com and thought I would just share it with you instead of re-writing it from memory. They are quick, easy and a great way to do a quilt block swap with friends. The circles are raw edge to no turning under the curves.

A project to share with others

The scrappy bullseye quilt is great to use as a swap with friends and family and also with online quilters. I will see if my daughter-in-law would be interested in working on one with me to replace this one that is worn out. We may live in different states, but we can work on individual blocks and I can finish it. 

I promise to share the finished quilt when we get it done.

If you ever have time to take part in a bullseye swap, do it – they are fun and easy and can be a much-loved quilt when finished.

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